Ruudt Peters Ouroboros brooch

Ouroboros Katanga, 1994, button-hole brooch / between-finger ring, silver, malachite, 4.25 x 1.5 x 1.375 inches

 

Starting with Ouroboros all series of jewellery were directly connected with alchemy, and the forms became rather undefined and asymmetrical while Peters’ preceding works were defined by a classical order...  In this period, Peters’ use of materials became more experimental and innovative. The rings from the Ouroboros series are constructed from two different parts, the one artificially made from silver, the other a raw mineral (culture versus nature), and the whole is covered with and protected by, a layer of paint which will slowly worn out when being worn (the influence of time). In this way the ring, which is actually not a normal ring but a construction that should be hold between the fingers, will show its hidden beauties only after time has passed and become more valuable for the wearer because it bears marks of time. 

Excerpted from Jewellery Is My Laboratory by Liesbeth den Besten, Metalsmith Magazine, July, 2007

Ruudt Peters Ouroboros brooch

Ouroboros Hora, 1995, button-hole brooch / between-finger ring, silver, silver nugget, 2.25 x 1.125 x .675 inches

Ruudt Peters Ouroboros brooch

Ouroboros Hurgada, 1995, button-hole brooch / between-finger ring, silver, coral, gold paint, 3.54 x 1.97 x 1.3 inches

Biography

Beginning in the 1970's, Ruudt Peters, a pioneering Dutch conceptual jewellery artist, challenged traditional definitions of adornment by pushing the boundaries of context, wearability, materials and presentation. A leader in art jewellery in Holland, Peters exemplifies a mode of expression that is unmistakably Dutch.

He has exerted a strong influence on the development of contemporary jewellery as an artist and as a professor at some of the most prestigious universities in Europe, the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam and Konstfack University of Arts and Crafts in Stockholm, where he was teaching till 2009. At the moment Peters is professor at Alchimia Contemporary Jewellery school, Florence, Italy